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Proposition 65 Compliance Statement

PROPOSITION 65 COMPLIANCE STATEMENT

The California Safe Drinking Water & Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Prop 65) Explained:
In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, commonly known as Proposition 65.

Proposition 65 requires the State of California to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm. This list, which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include over 900 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.
Proposition 65 requires businesses to provide Californians with a clear and reasonable warning about chemicals in the products they purchase, in their home or workplace, or that are released into the environment. By providing this information, Proposition 65 enables Californians to make informed decisions about protecting themselves from exposure to these chemicals. Proposition 65 also prohibits California businesses from knowingly discharging significant amounts of listed chemicals into sources of drinking water.

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) administers the Proposition 65 program. OEHHA, which is part of the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA), also evaluates all currently available scientific information on substances considered for placement on the Proposition 65 list.

What this means to you:
While the proposition was created to protect drinking water sources from chemical contamination, the scope of the law has expanded over the years. It now includes over 900 chemicals and also pertains to (but is not limited to) exposure through touch, inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact.
The Proposition 65 warning can now be found on products that may contain a small amount of over 900 chemicals or ingredients that the OEHHA lists as a carcinogen or reproductive toxicant. This includes vinyl, coatings, plastics, and much more.
Many of the elements listed under Proposition 65 are common everyday additives found in products like electrical wire, cable, coated fabrics, steering wheels, shoes, gloves, tonneau covers, bed liners, oil filter wrenches, brake pads, floor mats, etc.

Because of the vast array of products that might contain one of the chemicals or ingredients on the list, we must include Proposition 65 warnings in our communications with you. We are required to use exact wording as specified by the state of California. While the warning sounds alarming, the purpose is to notify you of the potential risk so that you can make an informed buying decision.

-PRW Industries, Inc

Mike Purugganan Jul 28, 2021 Uncategorized 0 Comment Read More

Team Fel-Pro Wins 2017 Hot Rodders of Tomorrow National Championship!

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A total of forty-five teams competed at the SEMA and PRI shows just to get into the Elite Eight competition. The top four SEMA show seeds against the top four PRI show seeds.

The top four teams that competed at the PRI Show were Team K&N, from Burton Center for Arts & Tech in Salem, VA, who came in fourth place with an average of 20:59. Team Derale from Forsyth Central High School in Cumming, GA, came in third place with an average of 20:25. Team QA1, from Forsyth Central High School from Cumming, GA, came in second place with an average of 18:29. And in first place came Team Meziere from Burton Center for Arts & Tech in Salem, VA. With the best average of 17:51.

The top four teams from the SEMA Show were Team Howards Cams, from Lakeshore High School in Stevensville, MI, with an average time of 19:07. Team Fragola Performance Systems, Fremd High School in Palatine, IL, came in second place with an average time of 20:56. Team Aeromotive, Eastern Oklahoma Technology Center out of Choctaw, OK. took third place with an average time of 21:52. Team Fel-Pro, Tulsa Technology Center from Broken Arrow, OK. came in fourth place with an average time of 23:08.

The times are based on three important parts. First it is the average of the three times the teams competed. Second, are the penalty minutes added for mistakes made during dis-assembly and re-assembly and the third part is a 50-question written test on parts and tools identification along with general engine and rules knowledge.

The Best Against the Best

The Elite Eight are the best and it showed! Only 3 seconds separated the first and second place teams, just 17 seconds between first and third place! But in the end Team Fel-Pro, Tulsa Technology Center from Broken Arrow, OK. came out on top with the average time of 17:06.

Team Fel-Pro instructor Greg Gilliam said “I was extremely shocked! I thought we may have placed 3rd until they announced the 3rd place team. The Team and I knew we got second place at that point and were very excited about 2nd, then they called the 2nd place team and it wasn’t us, my jaw hit the floor. I was speechless.” He also mentioned “I am extremely proud of my team and their hard work and determination to practice on their own time after school and

 

work. It feels good to know that my dedication to the students paid off for them. We are proud to represent Oklahoma and our school Tulsa Technology Center. Hard work and dedication reap rewards.”

Ann Skrycki-Mohler from Federal-Mogul said “Federal-Mogul Motorparts and the Fel-Pro brand have been honored to support this important program since its inception. We are proud not only of Team Fel-Pro, but of every participant from each of this year’s teams. Their exceptional skill and shared commitment to quality and performance point to a very bright future for the engine building industry.”

Each student earned scholarship opportunities ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 from Ohio Technical College, School of Automotive Machinists & Technology, and Universal Technical Institute.

For more information about the Hot Rodders of Tomorrow program or on how you can help, please contact:

Greg Parker

Phone: 574-315-1938

gparker@hotroddersoftomorrow.org

admin Dec 12, 2017 Uncategorized 1 Comment Read More